Trust Me, I'm a Storyteller

September 17, 2015

Writers in the Park, Centennial Park, Sydney. Sunday 27th September 10 am

Great new event for book lovers! Kids and adults alike are welcome to the inaugural and free

Writers in the Park logo

 Writers in the Park

at The Residences Centennial Park

on Sunday 27th September, 2015. 10 am start.

Free entry to the Writers in the Park events

Hosted by The Hughenden​ Boutique Hotel and The Residences Centennial Park

A chance to hear and meet authors and illustrators in one of the most scenic spots in Sydney

Fabulous food, fantastic books and great coffee on sale will make the day perfect, check out the links.

Full day program each for adults and for children with authors, illustrators, cartoonists, journalists, publishers, bookseller and books.

Centennial Parklands

Here’s the Program

& The Writers and Illustrators

including Jessica Rowe, Joanne McCarthy, Annabel Morely, Sunil Badami, Libby Hathorn, P M Newton, Deborah Abela, Anne Schofield, Bem Le Hunte, Lisa Heidke, Hazel Edwards, Susanne Gervay,  Susanna Freymark, Graham Rundle, Michael Parker, Philip Wilcox, Joanne Fedler,  Pamela Cook, Helen O’Dare, Robyn Arrowsmith, Maria Katsonis, Shelley Kenisberg, Reverend Gilmore, Rick Raftos, Shona Martyn and  Jane Curry.

Eastside Radio 89.7FM is setting up live podcast. See also: http://eastsidefm.org/writers-in-the-park-festival/

#‎SimonMarnie‬ from 702 ABC Sydney is interviewing Sunil Badami on Sunday morning on ABC702 radio.- listen in.

Susan Wyndam’s column in Saturday’s Sydney Morning Herald

Writers in the Park poster

Centennial Parklands – Writers in the Park

Writers in the Park website

Writers in the Park Facebook Page

#‎writepark‬

If you’re travelling to Sydney, why not stay at the Hughenden Hotel, 14 Queen Street Woollahra.

The Hughenden melds heritage with modern conveniences to meet individual needs. From cosy rooms to the Manor Suite, family apartments to pet-friendly rooms – with complimentary breakfast, complimentary wi-fi, guest lounge, dining, concierge services and function rooms.
Located at the crossroads of historic Woollahra and Paddington, and surrounded by designer fashion boutiques, restaurants, cafes, The Hughenden is opposite Centennial Parklands and in close proximity to the SCG, Allianz Stadium, the Entertainment Quarter, with easy access to the city and Bondi Beach.
Or if you’re really feeling like a treat have a look at the Residences Centennial Park.

The Residences Centennial Parkland

The Hughenden on Facebook

The Residences Centennial Park on Facebook

June 16, 2012

‘Alien Shores’ launched

Huge thanks to all who participated in our successful launch of Alien Shores.

We managed not one but four launches for Alien Shores: Tales of Refugees and Asylum Seekers.

Edited by Meenakshi Bharat and Sharon Rundle this volume features stories from Australia and the Indian subcontinent by Linda Jaivin, Arnold Zable, Amitav Ghosh, Susanne Gervay, Jamil Ahmad, Sophie Masson, Deepa Agarwal, Michelle Cahill, Joginder Paul, Ali Alizadeh, Tabish Khair, Abdul Karim Hekmat, Anu Kumar, Andrew Y M Kwong, Bijoya Sawian, Julia Mackay-Koelen, Sujata Sankranti, Sharon Rundle and Meenakshi Bharat; with a foreword by Rosie Scott.

The collection of stories is a transnational publication to bring stories from India to Australia and from Australia to India. In our brief to the authors, Meenakshi and I asked that the stories be fictional, original and not play the blame game; but reveal the deeper complexities of the lives of refugees and asylum seekers from many different perspectives. The authors responded to our brief by imaginatively showing the effect on people in their daily lives. These diverse, creative and imaginative stories cover some surprising territory. Each story is different and unique. This means that we have included stories that portray refugees in a less kindly light, stories with no happy endings, stories that are deeply moving and stories that inspire with their courage and hope, warmth and humour.

In Sydney, Alien Shores was launched on May 20 by Mr Amit Dasgupta, Consul-General of India, Sydney, at a stellar event sponsored by the Hughenden Hotel. Finding a person to launch a book is never a problem. The real achievement lies in having someone who has not only read the book but one who brings a unique understanding to it.

In releasing Alien Shores, the Consul-General of India, Sydney, Mr Amit Dasgupta addressed the audience in a way that showed compassion and understanding. He acknowledged the gravity of a world with a moving mosaic of refugees. He spoke of the need for us to show humanity and of how easily any one of us could be thrust into similar situations.  The Consul-General spoke with warmth, generosity and humour.

Photo of the Consul-General of India taken by Raihana Hekmat

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Roanna Gonsalves, our MC, made sure that the launch was beautifully paced. Editors Meenakshi Bharat and Sharon Rundle spoke about discovering the theme and collaborating to bring these stories from Australia and the Indian subcontinent together in a transnational collection. Linda Jaivin, Andrew Y M Kwong, Abdul Hekmat, Michelle Cahill, Susanne Gervay and Rosie Scott, who have given such support for Alien Shores, came along and read from their stories; and afterwards happily signed books at our tea party. Authors in the audience included David Malouf, Devika Brendon, Patti Miller, Libby Sommer, Mabel Lee, Jacquie Everitt, as well as film and theatre producers Ana Tiwari, Neel Banerjee and Devaki Monani from SBS Hindi Radio.

 Readings Bookstore hosted the launch of Alien Shores in Melbourne on May 21.

Julian Burnside QC gave a moving and eloquent speech to launch ‘Alien Shores’. Arnold Zable read briefly from his story in ‘The Dust of Life’, followed by author and poet Ali Alizadeh who spoke about the unique perspective of his story before treating the audience to a short reading from ‘The Ogre’.  Sharon and Meenakshi revealed more about publishing the collection of stories. Publisher Kabita Dhara, spoke about Brass Monkey Books and Alien Shores. Authors Jen McVeity, Hazel Edwards, Meredith Costain, Paul Collins, Rose Inserra, illustrator Marjory Gardner joined us to celebrate the release of Alien shores.

After toasting Alien Shores with a glass of bubbly, Meenakshi and I moved on to Lygon Street to a birthday dinner for Paul Collins with Susanne Gervay, Jen McVeity, Hazel Edwards, Meredith Costain, Rose Inserra, illustrator Marjory Gardner and Edwin Wandha where we consumed some delish pasta and a few more bubbles.

Gosford Library Services held a Preview Launch on May 18 at their Erina Library on the NSW Central Coast.

        

Guest of Honour, Deb O’Neill, Federal MP, gave an impassioned speech about the theme of the book. Her deep understanding and recognition of the purpose of the book and the individual stories within, as she launched the volume had the audience spellbound. Andrew Y M Kwong, Michelle Cahill, Julia Mackay-Koelen attended the launch. Editors Sharon Rundle and Meenakshi Bharat talked about the value of reading the stories by authors from India and Australia in Alien Shores. John Caska, acted as MC to introduce the guest speakers.

 Gloucester Writers’ Festival launched Alien Shores during their warm and friendly lunch time event.

The festival featured writers Michael Wilding, Lisa Heidke, Lisa Walker and Susanne Gervay who was keynote speaker. Andrew Y M Kwong and Sharon Rundle read from their stories. Sharon spoke about the genesis of the book and Susanne gripped the audience with her story of her refugee background.

 

 Alien Shorespresents nineteen remarkable stories from acclaimed writers based in Australia and the Indian Subcontinent, which ruminate on the lives of refugees and asylum seekers all over the world. Powerful, poignant and sometimes funny, they tell the tales of brave people who, at great peril to their own safety, seek out a new life in a new land.

Alien Shores is available in all good book stores, including the Coop Bookshop, Berkelouw Paddington, Abbeys, Dymocks, Gleebooks, QBD.

 Alien Shores is published by Brass Monkey Books an imprint of Hunter Publishers.

 brassmonkey@hunterpublishers.com.au

 for any enquiries

 

ALIEN SHORES IS AVAILABLE FROM MAY 2012 FROM UNITED BOOK DISTRIBUTORS

 

 Brass Monkey Books Australia

Editors: Meenakshi Bharat and Sharon Rundle (Eds)

Publish Date: May 2012

ISBN-13:9780980863932

ISBN-10:0980863937

Origin:Australia

Imprint:Hunter Publishers

Publisher:U.Q.P.

December 19, 2010

Wanted: Your views on E-Books – Campaign to save the Dorothea Mackellar Award – and ‘A Bunch of Hazelnuts’.

 

Are you a publisher, editor, author?

If so, the government is interested in hearing your views on E-Books, according to Barry Jones in his article in the Sydney Morning Herald.

For more about how you can have your thoughts and opinion heard  and for the full article — go to the Sydney Morning Herald, The future of books is a real page-turner by Barry Jones, December 13, 2010 

Barry Jones is the chairman of the Book Industry Strategy Group. Ideas can be submitted to www.innovation.gov.au/bisg until January 31.

An example of a New E-Book reader

Take a look at some of the new E-Book covers available now.


 

Hot on the heels of the campaign to save our School Magazine, we now hear news of another campaign to save the Dorothea Mackellar Poetry Awards.

'My Country' by Dorothea Mackellar

A recent report found that: A new international study shows Australian students compare well to those overseas, but the nation is slipping when it comes to literacy. But despite scoring well in literacy, Australia has still slipped in the ratings. “Australia is one of only five OECD countries in which reading literacy levels have declined,” said Geoff Masters, chief executive of the Australian Council for Educational Research, which conducted the national part of the study. “So we have fewer 15-year-olds now performing at high levels in reading than we did in the year 2000.

You can read the  full ABC article: Australian students’ literacy levels declining by Timothy McDonald.

 

  If this is the case, then why are Australian Federal and State governments reducing funding and support for these Australian literary icons? Surely, they have proved their worth by their longevity and popularity?

 If you’re interesting in lending your support for the Dorothea Mackellar Awards to continue, please read the article From the NSW Association for Gifted & Talented Children website http://nswagtc.org.au/mynswagtc/news/1204-dorotheas-demise.html

    

Dorothea Mackellar

HELP SAVE THE DOROTHEA MACKELLAR AWARDS

 WHAT YOU CAN DO –

Send your objections to Graham.Nuttall@aph.gov.au  and/or Tony.Windsor@aph.gov.au Tell these people how important poetry is in Australia and to Australian children. At a time when literacy is supposed to be a priority, it seems absurd that this funding would have been cut. 

 


 

Multi-award winning author, Hazel Edwards shares a story of tutoring an adult writing class and the resulting Bunch of Hazelnuts:

Hazel Edwards: A Tutor’s Perspective

A Bunch of Hazelnuts

 All adult writing classes are different. Chances are you’ll have experts from varied fields, and that’s the delight. We all learn together. Classmates include engineers, rap musicians, truckies, hairdressers, potters, gardeners, singers, psychologists, nannies, herbalists, actors, speech pathologists, teachers, parents, chemists, check-out chicks and roosters, interpreters, illustrators, and I’ve even had an ex-spy in an earlier class. Many speak and write multiple languages.

It just so happens that my skills are in crafting ideas in accessible English and anecdultery (structuring mini stories with humour). Age, shape, gender or culture doesn’t matter, except in the first five minutes in the opening class, and in providing perspectives and facts from which to write.

My adult students are aware of my deficiencies in admin, formatting and filling in rolls. But I hope they gain a realistic insight into the workstyle of a professional creator.

Most people who enrol for a year-long writing project course, have a subject about which they are passionate. Their content matters. They have ‘real’ experience of value to others in our society. They just need help writing it. Often ‘tragic’ historical material needs to be crafted so the writer can make sense of a past, but the reader is not overwhelmed and rejects the story.  Common strands are those who wish to write aspects of their family history for grandkids or to make sense of their migrant parents’ earlier struggles. Others want to write How to books in their specialties, such as health, cooking or racing. Some plan autobiographies but often settle on ‘memoirs’ focussing on important stages.

Writing is more than therapy. An amateur writes for the love of writing and for themselves as the only reader (or maybe their Mum). A professional invests time to craft those ideas and experiences in a format more people will read, so it’s effective use of time, both ways.

As a self-employed author, I encourage habits which will enable creators to work regularly and to a high standard, but also to get recognition for their efforts. We ‘celebrate’ acceptance, publication or awards, with champagne, or even an ‘imaginary’ toast. Networking is encouraged, beyond the class, so that those with a significant story to tell about extra-ordinary ‘so called ordinary’ people, can do so.

 Why do I teach in a TAFE as a sessional lecturer? I was asked to ‘fill in’ by author Garry Disher, about 20 years ago. I enjoy seeing the ‘light bulb’ moment when an adult student understands I am a mentor, partly because I didn’t have a writing mentor when I needed one as a beginning author. I consider that I am ‘giving back’ in practical ways from the viewpoint of a practitioner, not an academic dealing only in theory.

I’m also an authorpreneur, aware of the need for an artist to learn media skills and to initiate paid work. TAFE courses offer ‘a second chance’ to those who wish to learn new skills when they are ready to do so, at any age. When an adult student ‘gets it together’ in a well-crafted piece, this gives me pleasure.

Taking a weekly class, forces me to analyse techniques, and keep up with topical examples. We swap recommended books. A writing tutor’s role is to offer technical suggestions, and set up a workshopping environment in which people’s stories can be crafted for a wider audience. The rest of the class create the public opinion responses (which may differ) enabling ‘testing’ of those ideas.

Commercial publication is not the only aim, but on average 3-4 books are published by major publishers within a couple of years of those students completing their year-long course. Others find their aims change. Completing the writing of a book length project is a creative achievement, inspiring the confidence to tackle other goals.

Many ex-students retain contact, because friendships have been formed from the depth of ideas explored, or from new socialising via galleries, book launches and festival attendance. Lives have been deepened because others’ motivations are better understood.

 A ‘freelance’ used to be a medieval mercenary with a lance for hire. A freelance writer can be many things. An ex-student, now a published author and exhibited artist, told me that a ‘filbert’ is a cultured hazel nut, and maybe that could be my pseudonym. A freelance filbert? A bunch of filberts doesn’t have the same ambiguity of title, but … Titles are vital. I am proud that my students have called this a Hazelnuts Collection, or even colloquially the ‘Hazelnits’. Playing with words works.

Hazel Edwards (c) 2010

http://www.hazeledwards.com/

Of Hazel Edwards’ 200 published books for adults and children, the best known is There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake, soon to be a film with Pocket Bonfire Productions. In 2010 she wrote the novel f2m:the boy within, on transitioning gender, with Ryan Kennedy who is the first ftm.( female to male) co-author of YA fiction on this subject internationally. On the Australian Society of Authors committee of management, Hazel holds the Education portfolio. She’s been nominated for the international 2011 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award and is a recipient of the peer awarded ASA Medal in 2009. She’s also proud of her ‘espionage network of ex-students’ using their writing skills in diverse occupations.

Thanks, Hazel, for your inspiring story – I’m sure a Hazelnuts Collection is a great read.

   

  

Happy writing, until next time,

Sharon

 

 

November 10, 2010

World Matters – Writers Disturbing the Peace at Eltham

 

What a stimulating and thought-provoking weekend it was. The speakers were articulate and passionate about their books, poetry and music. Topics covered Indigenous books and writing, the climate and environment, refugees and asylum seekers, the effects of terrorism; and some of the best poetry I’ve heard in a long time from the Adelaide Friendly Street Poets and others including Yahia al-Samawy.

The lovely Montsalvat is created in the ‘arts and crafts’ style and is a visual delight. Meenakshi, co-editor of Fear Factor Terror Incognito (Picador India & Australia 2010) was offered a Montsalvat Residency during her visit here.

The hall where World Matters was held was large with good acoustics but still had a cosy atmosphere. Despite the lashing rain, there was an excellent roll-up for the sessions. The unceasing rain also meant an indoor rather than outdoor barbecue lunch but spirits remained high.

Meera Govil, owner of Eltham Bookshop, held the whole event together, including organising speakers, sessions, refreshments and books. Morag Fraser, who flew in from the U.S. for World Matters, was a sterling MC for the two days of World Matters.

Some of the most poignant stories came from Ros Moriarty and John Bradley; and the courageous women of East Timor whose stories are chilling but infinitely inspiring. The book of their stories, Step by Step is available now and recommended reading. The East Timorese Women exhibited their exquisitely woven sarongs, wall hangings, scarves, bookmarks and other examples of their craft at Montsalvat. The fine thread is coloured using natural dyes in the traditional way. They had an example to show how they create the warp and the weft to make their gorgeous garments.

Devika Brendon, Susanne Gervay, Meenakhi Bharat formed a panel to speak about Fear Factor Terror Incognito, which I chaired. Each of the authors read from and discussed their stories which was followed by questions from the audience.

 Photo by Yahia al-Samawy, whose poetry was a highlight of World Matters.

As well as listening to the speakers being interviewed and the panel discussions, we met so many fascinating people. The people of Eltham extended such a warm welcome to us all. Meenakshi and I were taken through the Yarra Glen by Jan Aitken, it was great to see the Yarra valley but we were stunned by the extent of the damage from the bushfires last summer. The trees and plants in the national park are valiantly trying to recover but it looks as if it will be a long time before that happens, some may never recover. So it was heartening to see the creeks flowing after all the rain and Jan was suprised by the rise in the level of water in the local reservoir. Susanne Gervay made a trip out to Marysville to take books for the children.

If you missed Eltham’s World Matters this time around be sure to plan for it and book in for 2011.

Fear Factor in Westerly Volume 55

Fear Factor Terror Incognito (published Picador India and Australia 2010) features in an essay on Australian literature by Elizabeth Webby, published in Westerly, Volume 55 (the first of issue of Westerly 2010) which is out and available now from Gleebooks and other good book shops.

Congratulations and Commiserations

Congratulations to Hazel Edwards who is nominated for the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award 2011 for children’s and youth literature.

Commiserations and Get well Wishes to Jeremy Fisher–who missed Eltham World Matters–hope your foot is improving, Jeremy.

 

 

July 14, 2010

Hippotamus Party, Zoo E-Books, Journal Prompts, Flooded Worlds and introducing our National Literacy Ambassador.

The Hippopotamus Celebrates 30 Years with a Birthday Party!

Hazel Edwards is celebrating the 30th Anniversary of ‘There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake’ with the release of  ‘Hooray! There’s a Hoppopotamus on Our Roof Having a Birthday Party’, illustrated by Deborah Niland and published Penguin (RRP $24.95). The latest Hippopotamus book had a very favourable review in The Sun-Herald on June 27. It is warm and funny with delightful illustrations to appeal to ages three and up.

Hooray! There's a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Having a Birthday Party!

Author: Hazel Edwards. Illustrator Deborah Niland.
Publisher:
Published by Penguin. 1 March 2010.
Imprint:
Viking
ISBN:
9780670072637
Format:
Hardback, 32 pages
RRP:
$24.95

http://www.penguin.com.au/contributors/hazel-edwards

Hazel Edwards  – www.hazeledwards.com

ASA Medal 2009
Nanjing-Aust Cultural Exchange Author

On Sunday July 4th the Event Management students of Victoria University organised a major Hippo Birthday party event at the SLV Experimedia, as well as a hippo exhibition contest for the libraries and schools.

Take a look at  the forthcoming hippo Pocket Bonfire film

For more about ‘Hooray! There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Having a Birthday Party: http://www.hazeledwards.com/books/hippo/hippo-birthday-party.htm


Australian National Literacy Ambassador for 2010.

Deborah Abela with her book 'Max Remy Super Spy'

Deborah Abela is the Australian National Literacy Ambassador for 2010. Sharon Rundle interviewed Deborah about her forthcoming duties and the release of her latest bookGrimsdonfor 8 – 12 year old readers. Grimsdon, published by Random House Australia will be out in August.

Deborah is enthusiastic about her role as National Literacy Ambassador and has made an advertisement with National Numeracy Ambassador, Simon Pampena that will go to air in late August. She ‘can’t wait to get out and about talking about kids’ books and how important it is to create a nation of kids who love books!’ She says, ‘Books help create empathy and awareness as well as adding a voice to what kids themselves care about and want to know more about.’

Deborah has been writing for kids for seventeen years—ten as a novelist. Her very successful Max Remy Superspy and Jasper Zammit (Soccer Legend) series and The Remarkable Secret of Aurelie Bonhoffen have captured the imaginations of her young readers.

Her latest novel ‘Grimsdon’ is her most action-packed and swashbuckling to date! It is very much driven by the kids who face living in a flooded world caused by adults ignoring the warnings of climate peril. ‘There have been a few post-apocalyptic films and stories in the last few years and even though my characters face a world that has changed, there is still a lot to be hopeful about, including the fact that these courageous kids will be our future,’ Deborah says. ‘Grimsdon is the first book I have written, though, where the kids are not only on their own but the adults who are around are out to get them and use them for their own gains. This book then has called on my characters to be at their most creative, inventive and resourceful for their own survival.’

Articles based on the interview with Deborah will appear in the UTS Writers Connect E-Journal and other publications (more details later).

Watch out for the reviews of Grimsdon, the book will be released in August.

Grimdson, published Random House Australia

Deborah Abela has a terrific interactive website at www.deborahabela.com where young readers, parents and teachers can find out more about her books. There are also competitions, YouTube videos and writing tips. She loves to hear from her readers whether the comments are ‘good or bad’. Their comments are important to her and she answers every email they send to her.

She’ll also be listing all the places she’ll be visiting on her website under ‘Coming Events’.

Deborah sent the following details:

National Literacy and Numeracy Week

When: 29 August to 4 September leading up to International Literacy Day on 8 September.

Aim: National Literacy and Numeracy Week (NLNW) is an Australian Government initiative. NLNW aims to recognise and celebrate the achievements of parents, teachers, principals, and members of the wider community who are making a difference to the development of literacy and numeracy skills in our nation’s children.

showcase the hard work school communities are undertaking to improve literacy and numeracy skills

recognise the outstanding results being achieved by Australians everyday

raise community awareness of the importance of literacy and numeracy skills for all Australian students and for the prosperity of the nation, and

build on national initiatives to improve literacy and numeracy standards among young Australians.

Theme: Learning for Living.

Who are the Ambassadors: Literacy: Deborah Abela and Maths: Simon Pampena

The role of the Literacy and Numeracy Ambassadors:

Lots of talking to kids and parents about books, reading, maths and how important they are for our daily lives but also how fun they can be. As the Literacy Ambassador, Deborah will be attending a special launch on August 30 to officially open the festivities. The rest of the week, Deb will be attending a series of schools, conducting author talks and writing workshops and chatting to the media about literacy: ie how much fun reading and books are! Deborah will be taking her role well outside the bounds of NLNW….as she has been doing for over ten years now, she will be doing all she can to get kids excited about books and stories at schools, festivals and conferences all over Australia. 

Why are Literacy and Numeracy skills important?

Literacy and numeracy skills are fundamental life skills that enable students to progress in school, further study, training and work. The promotion of strong literacy and numeracy skills in young people assists in countering educational and social disadvantage, and is critically important to Australia’s future prosperity and position in the world.

When did NLNW begin?

Initiated in 1999, NLNW began as National Literacy Week targeted at primary schools. It has since been extended to reach secondary school students. A numeracy element was added in 2001, resulting in the Week becoming known as National Literacy and Numeracy Week.

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Programs/NationalLiteracyandNumeracyWeek/Pages/default.aspx

For the role:

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Programs/NationalLiteracyandNumeracyWeek/Pages/2010NationalAmbassadors.aspx


News from Christopher Chen

who writes to say: ‘okay folks … just HAD to share this with you!!!  … Check out the following link to see the new ebook!!!

http://chrischengauthor.blogspot.com/2010/06/monkey-businness-promo-trailer.html

who’s a happy animal now!

And there are more coming! See the new Zoo you later! ebook and app.

I will write up a post about creating the eBook shortly.

And the article might be about the Prime Minster of Australia but look at her bookshelves!

http://chrischengauthor.blogspot.com/

or http://tinyurl.com/29glo8s

Cheers, Chris.

the blog: http://chrischengauthor.blogspot.com ***new

Chris’s website: www.chrischeng.com
SCBWI Australia & NZ: www.scbwiaustralia.org
New Aussie kids books: http://newkidsbooksinoz.blogspot.com


Helen Whitehead

Congrats to my friend and colleague on her new full time appointment as Learning Support Development Officer at the University of Nottingham—well done, Helen.

You can follow Helen on twitter and on her Blog where you’ll find regular journal prompts.

http://dailyjournallingprompts.blogspot.com/

Helen and I are currently working on the Season of Inspiration Peacock Memosaic of stories and poems.

Blog at WordPress.com.

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