Trust Me, I'm a Storyteller

September 16, 2011

Commonwealth Short Story Prize-winning Stories announced.

Overall Winner and Regional Winner, Canada and Europe is

Philip Nash from the United Kingdom for his story Rejoinder

Read the winning story by Philip Nash,

the Regional winners,

Highly Commended and Special Prize stories

on the Commonwealth Foundation website.

And remember to write a story to enter next year!

New writer triumphs in Commonwealth Short Story Competition

Philip Nash wins 2011 Prize

Press release

In 2012 the competition will be re-launched as the Commonwealth Short Story Prize under the new banner Commonwealth Writers – a world of new fiction. Find out more at www.commonwealthwriters.org

June 4, 2011

The Kids and Young Adult Literature festival at the NSW Writers Centre

The Kids and Young Adult Literature festival brings:-
New Work, New Directions, New Opportunities

The best in Australian kids’ and YA authors, playwrights, film script writers , multi platform publishers from HarperCollins and Random house, independent and online publishing, apps  and there’s the chance to pitch your idea.

"Butterflies" Indonesia Cover

Susanne Gervay award winning children’s and young adult author is the Director of the Children’s and YA Literature Festival bringing exciting publishers and creators  up close and personal to you:– keynote with Olympian swimmer, ABC broadcaster and author Lisa Forrest, Monkey Baa Theatre,  ABC TV script writers, best seller series authors Duncan Ball, Jacqueline Harvey, Sophie Masson, Kate Forsyth and more.

Pitch your work to a Publishing Panel.

It’s one of the few times you can talk to authors, publishers, multi media experts, network, meet your writing community and have a drink on the balcony afterwards as the sun sets over Rowen House the home of the NSW Writers Centre.

Date: 25th June 2011
Time: 9.30 am – 5 p.m.
Place: The NSW Writers Centre
Cost: $50 members ($80 non members)
Parking: Freely available
p: 02 9555 9757
e: nswwc@nswwc.org.au
http://www.nswwc.org.au

Booking essential       

If you need somewhere to stay in Sydney, I recommend The Hughenden at 14 Queen Street Woollahra.

May 26, 2011

Writing a Successful Synopsis.

 The very idea of writing a Synopsis can make a novelist shudder.

The Synopsis Scream

Compacting a full length work or a collection of stories or poems into a page or two to pitch to a publisher is an art in itself.

Synopsis head-scratching

Very few examples of successful synopses are available and the advice that is there can be conflicting. One excellent book is ‘A Decent Proposal’ by Rhonda Whitton, she shows step by step how to put together a book proposal that will impress publishers. It not only allows the writer to assemble a ‘decent proposal’ but also makes the writer really think about the different aspects of publishing a book. By going through the steps to create a book proposal, the writer has also had to answer various questions about their manuscript which makes them better prepared for the publishing process. I know, I’ve used it myself. However, it does only lightly touch on exactly how to write the dreaded synopsis.

************************************************************************************************

Varuna newsletter March 2011 also has some advice. 

Author! Author! Blog 

This blog is written in a very accessible way and gives tips on How to Write a really good Synopsis.  Practical advice dished up with humour from the point of view of an editor and agency screener. Much of it is written tongue in cheek, nevertheless there is sound advice in there. It’s a UK blog but still relevant, especially if you are thinking of submitting work to the UK. Though, as I mentioned earlier, some of it conflicts with the advice given in ‘A Decent Proposal’ which is aimed at Australian authors.

The Author! Author! blog has loads of links to other pages with advice on book proposals, pitching a story, formatting and submitting a manuscript, editing as well as writing techniques.

Some of the advice that is on offer recommends chapter by chapter summaries, others say summaries should be avoided or that the chapters and scenes should be described rather than summarised. Some suggest writing a synopsis along the lines of a jacket blurb; others advise against it.

Most agree, though, that formatting should be in the style of a manuscript, with indented paragraphs and 1.5 line spacing; 2.5cm margins; 12 pt font. A running head with author name, book title and page numbers should be shown on each page (though the first page is optional). The book title and author name and the word ‘synopsis’ should appear at the beginning.

Successful Synopsis!

Have you written a successful synopsis?

Would you care to share it as an example?

Have you found some practical and sound advice about writing a successful synopsis?

Many writers are looking for advice, tips, templates or examples that will give them a strategy for writing their synopsis. Let us know what you think.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: